Adolescent Programs

Adolescent Programs

The Women’s Center offers two primary programs for adolescents: Teens Climb High and M.A.G.I.C (Media Analysis of Gender and Image Construction). Teens Climb High M.A.G.I.C (Media Analysis of Gender and Image Construction)
Teens Climb High

Teens Climb High (TCH) is an empowerment program for middle school girls from low-income videosgays.org families in Chapel Hill and Carrboro. TCH provides participants with comprehensive support to make positive life choices and avoid teen pregnancy. Girls begin TCH in 6th grade and typically remain in the program until they graduate from middle school. The program includes a number of components including after-school programming, mentoring, enrichment activities and case management.

• After-School Sessions
All girls participate in weekly group sessions that focus on health and sexuality education, videosdelesbianas.xxx communication and decision-making skills, conflict resolution, and service-learning.
• One-on-one Mentoring Each participant is matched with an adult mentor who spends two-hours a week with the girl doing a variety of fun, one-on-one activities together in the community.
• Case Management/Family Support TCH staff members maintain regular contact with families and help parents connect with community resources. TCH staff also collaborates with school personnel and facilitates the girls’ involvement with academic support services.
• Enrichment Activities Girls participate in special events throughout the year. These activities focus on team building, outdoor recreation, and exposure to valuable cultural experiences.

To learn more about Teens Climb High or for information about how to volunteer, please contact Kate Holbein Rademacher or Lisa Bender by phone at 919.968.4610 or by email. The M.A.G.I.C Project M.A.G.I.C. (Media Analysis of Gender and Image Construction), a media literacy program for middle and high school youth, gives participants the knowledge and skills they need to analyze and evaluate media messages related to gender, body image, violence, money and relationships. One-time presentations and multi-session groups are offered to boys and girls in a variety of settings. Staff is available to provide programming for schools and other community groups, as well as to offer consultation and training to educators who are interested in media literacy. The following workshops are available through the M.A.G.I.C program:

Media Manipulation: Introduction to Media Analysis Boxed In: Media, Gender Stereotypes, and Violence Prevention Body Talk: Media, Body Image, and Eating Disorder Prevention Dollars & Sense: Media, Money, and Financial Literacy What’s Eating You?: Media, Nutrition and Obesity Prevention Reel Relationships: Relationships and Sexuality in the Media Making Media, Making Change: Media Literacy Action Projects for Students. Women’s Center Services:
“Thank you for your help in getting me out there,” said Ann*, a career counseling client at The Women’s Center. “You gave me help and that big push I needed.” Many women seek the Center’s services as they go through a major life transition. Ann’s husband had just announced he wanted a divorce, and Ann had been a homemaker for many years. Through our New Choices career program, we showed her the skills she had and guided her towards steady employment. 210 Henderson StreetFounded in 1979, The Women’s Center empowers women and girls to realize their potential. We are a non-profit resource center offering information, education, referral and support services to Triangle area women and their families. Core offerings include:

Legal Information, Financial Counseling, Career Counseling, Adolescent Programs, Community Education Workshops and Support Groups, Information and Referral, Annual Art Exhibition The Center serves nearly 6,000 women and men each year from Orange, Durham, Chatham, Wake, and Alamance counties and beyond. Utilizing a small staff and network of dedicated volunteers, we strive to provide an atmosphere of trust and acceptance where women can learn from each other:

Julie* took the “How to Cope when Your Relationship Ends” workshop because her husband had suddenly left her and their ten-year-old child. It helped her to talk with other women experiencing the loss of a partner, and she said the program “gave me the tools to help me through this crisis and empowered me to do so.” She also bought a copy of our Family Law in North Carolina book and made an appointment with the Legal Information Service to educate herself about child support issues. Debbie*, a financial counseling client, was in graduate school with high debt. She was raising her child alone with her only income being student loans and sporadic child support. Sitting down and talking over her finances with a certified volunteer financial counselor helped. “It was practical information that I can use, plus it was provided in a positive, gentle manner.”

The Women’s Center SilkscreenThe Women’s Center celebrates the talent, diversity and strength of thewomen in our community and works to overcome the barriers of race, age, class, educational level, and sexual orientation. Our adolescent programs include Teens Climb High, which targets girls from low-income families and matches them with mentors. Along with weekly activities such as horseback riding or attending a circus performance, one 8th grade girl and her mentor have developed a strong bond over the last two years. The Teens Climb High girl described her mentor as “real nice and giving. She’s like a part of my family.” We are often the first line of contact for women in crisis. We respond annually to over 3,500 personal calls for information and referral and to hundreds from other area agencies, and we maintain up-to-date notebooks on job listings, attorneys, therapists, and lesbian/bisexual/transgender resources.

The Women’s Center’s programs are funded in part by the Triangle United Way, the Towns of Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Hillsborough, and Orange County. The Center depends on individual contributions, membership dues, program fees and fundraising events such as our annual art exhibition, Through Women’s Eyes, By Women’s Hands to cover operating expenses. Many of The Women’s Center programs and services are free and those with fees are available on a sliding scale basis. No one is turned away due to an inability to pay for services. For a complete history of The Women’s Center, please go to TWC Herstory. Names have been changed to protect the identity of our clients.